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Author Topic:   Welding Equip Advice
Harrys'65
Esteemed Member

Posts: 152
From:Saint Paul, MN
Registered: Sep 99

posted 10-04-2000 03:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Harrys'65   Click Here to Email Harrys'65     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I am thinking about learning to weld, and need some advice. What do I want to get as a basic unit to work on car metal(sheet metal). Wire feed? AC?
Anything I should avoid? I am basically clueless, but it just seems that if I can learn to weld, it will save me a ton of grief.
There are a few used units in the work newspaper for sale that I am looking at: 230 amp Lincoln AC Welder for $100. Any thoughts?

IP: 192.28.2.12

66351stang
Esteemed Member

Posts: 172
From:sayville,newyork
Registered: Jul 2000

posted 10-04-2000 04:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 66351stang   Click Here to Email 66351stang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
HEY HARRY!! YOUR BEST BET IS A GOOD MIG WELDER, EASY AS PIE TO USE,FOR YOUR CAR REPAIRS IT IS AWESOME. YOU DON'T NEED A 230 AMP..I HAVE A HOBART 110 CURRENT,AND I BOUGHT AN AUTO DIM FACE SHEILD..MOSTLY ANYTHING YOU ARE GOING TO WELD THE MIG WILL HANDLE..STAY AWAY FROM ARCH WELDER'S THE ARE A THING OF THE PAST I PURCHASED THE SMALL ARGON TANK..LAST ME FOREVER,DID ALL MY BODY PANEL'S AND FLOOR PAN'S,WELDED IN THE REAR
FRAME RAIL HALF'S.. NO PROBLEM

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ponycar66,have you flown in a ford latley???????
66-COUPE W/351SVO

IP: 205.188.198.167

Toolguy
New to M&M

Posts: 7
From:Garden City, MI.
Registered: Mar 2000

posted 10-04-2000 04:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Toolguy   Click Here to Email Toolguy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A Migwelder with argon gas for sheetmetal works good for me.You can run fluxcore in a mig, but the solid wire with the gas don't burn thru as easy.I have the Miller 130 plugs into 110volt plug and works great!
As for the stick I wouldn't have a chance on old sheetmetal I think you would have to be a talented welder to not burn thru!!

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Bob

IP: 24.4.252.129

Bob429
Esteemed Member

Posts: 174
From:Watervliet,MI,USA
Registered: Jun 99

posted 10-04-2000 06:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Bob429   Click Here to Email Bob429     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A Miller 130 with argon is my choice also.

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Bob
71 J code
429 SCJ-R Sportsroof
C6 4:11

IP: 206.141.246.19

mellowyellow
Esteemed Member

Posts: 223
From:miami, fl.
Registered: Aug 2000

posted 10-04-2000 06:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mellowyellow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have a Daytona Mig. It is actually an Italian made unit. It works good and parts are not a problem. but I am sorry that I did not get a Miller.

IP: 205.188.198.178

65driver
New to M&M

Posts: 34
From:Syracuse, NY, USA
Registered: Feb 2000

posted 10-04-2000 07:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 65driver   Click Here to Email 65driver     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Has anyone heard of a Clarke Mig Welder. I have a chance to pick up a brand new one for 250.00 bucks. Anybody have any experience with them?

IP: 24.95.160.100

65ragtop
New to M&M

Posts: 4
From:Pleasant Hill, CA USA
Registered: Oct 2000

posted 10-04-2000 07:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 65ragtop   Click Here to Email 65ragtop     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hi. Newbie here; been reading the board for a while, thought I'd jump in, since I, too, am going to begin welding.

I can't devote the time it will take to enroll in a community college course, so I'm going to wing it.

I know I want a MIG (and have spotted the 240V Lincoln at Home Depot---I see the advice that 110V is enough, but, ARRRR-ARRR-ARRR, I want more power. Any reason I don't want/shouldn't get the 240V?)

But I also wonder, should I invest time/money in Oxyacetylene, as well? Will jumping into a MIG leave me without some fundamentals I need? And how valuable is it to be able to cut stuff up with the torch? Or is an air saw enough? Mostly want to work on my Mustang, but also wouldn't mind crafting some ornamental/functional backyard stuff.

Is it worth it? Can I teach myself enough without blowing up the house?

Jerry

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65 convertible, factory I6 swapped to 302 2V

IP: 128.107.129.22

66351stang
Esteemed Member

Posts: 172
From:sayville,newyork
Registered: Jul 2000

posted 10-04-2000 07:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 66351stang   Click Here to Email 66351stang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
hi ragtop,funny thing is use car people can just about justify any reason for buying anything ,believe me i have a garage that is probaly equiped more than or equal to a pro.shop .god forbid my garage ever caught fire,it would probaly take out four or five
house's .case being when you restore or just toy around with car's you need everything

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ponycar66,have you flown in a ford latley???????
66-COUPE W/351SVO

IP: 152.163.213.193

67stang
Esteemed Member

Posts: 402
From:Lynn Haven FL
Registered: Jun 99

posted 10-04-2000 10:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 67stang   Click Here to Email 67stang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I am going to state the unobvious, and may take some flak for it but here goes..........

For those of you who want to learn how to weld, the best way to start is with oxy-acetylene-torches. If you can master that, than you can get mig or arc welding.
Mig welding is probably the easiest to learn. Basically point and go. For the body panels it is a great idea. But for those of you who may be welding outdoors (me) argon gas is out. Flux core is in.

Want real fun welding? Try learning aluminum welding. PITA.

I personally have two torch set ups, two migs and two arc machines (a 110V and a 240V).

If you have a hacksaw, you don't need a torch for cutting. Just makes things easier. I have an older power hacksaw that I use for cutting.

IP: 209.255.7.46

mellowyellow
Esteemed Member

Posts: 223
From:miami, fl.
Registered: Aug 2000

posted 10-04-2000 11:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mellowyellow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
another opinion. Hot wrenches, in the hands of a novice can be a disaster. It is easier to warp sheet metal and burn holes with a torch. A mig is easier to learn and can be a valuable tool after some practice on sheet metal. Concerning a 110 v mig, I put in rails, torque boxes, and floor pans in a 66 cvt. A torch is handy for cutting out the rusty stuff. Drilling spot welds sucks! The ll0 v mig allows plenty of penetration with some practice. I've never used a mig outdoors. Stick welders require practice. I hired a guy to put rails in another cvt and he used a Lincoln AC buzz box. His work was super but he was also an experienced welder.

IP: 205.188.198.52

Diggedirt
New to M&M

Posts: 29
From:Peoria, Illinois
Registered: Oct 2000

posted 10-04-2000 11:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Diggedirt   Click Here to Email Diggedirt     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
67stang, what do you mean with the outdoor remark, DOING the welding outdoors or welding things that will be outdoors(exposed to the elements)? Just looking for the best set-up myself and it is good to hear from some people who know-this place is great!
FRANKSTER

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72 MACH 1

IP: 207.179.192.198

mellowyellow
Esteemed Member

Posts: 223
From:miami, fl.
Registered: Aug 2000

posted 10-05-2000 07:04 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mellowyellow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Not meant as a remark-just the fact that I didn't weld outdoors. Migs do not like a breeze of any kind. Some put up a shield to lessen any breezes!

IP: 152.163.194.198

Robert K
Esteemed Member

Posts: 108
From:Nashville, TN
Registered: Apr 2000

posted 10-05-2000 07:55 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert K   Click Here to Email Robert K     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I also have the millermatic 130 and am extremely pleased with it. I would not recommend oxy-acetylene for welding sheet metal. It's just too easy to warp the panels. The 240V welders are fine but just remember that you will be somewhat limited as to where you can weld. What I mean by that is if a buddy asks you to come over to his house and weld something you won't be able to do it unless he either has the 240V or can bring it to you. I've never been sorry that I got the 110V unit. It has welded everything from frame rails to thin sheetmetal. The thinner metal takes quite a bit of practice and "teasing" of the trigger on the welding gun(for MIG). I know that everyone has an opinion of which type of welding is best for this or that but from what I've heard, read and my own experiences, you just can't beat a good MIG welder for working on old cars for the versatility and ease of use.
Just my .02 worth.

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67convertible 289/auto
65fastback 302/4sp

IP: 199.91.39.254

Harrys'65
Esteemed Member

Posts: 152
From:Saint Paul, MN
Registered: Sep 99

posted 10-05-2000 11:08 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Harrys'65   Click Here to Email Harrys'65     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Ok, thank you for all the input. To summarize, MIG welders are the way to go, a dual Argon/non-gas unit is best, Miller makes great units, and practice makes perfect.
Sounds like a plan. I was hoping to get into this for less than $300, but it looks like a $500-$600 aquisition. Christmas is coming!!

Harry

IP: 192.28.2.12

R Rainwater
Esteemed Member

Posts: 279
From:Puxico,MO. USA
Registered: Jul 99

posted 10-05-2000 08:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for R Rainwater   Click Here to Email R Rainwater     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
65driver, I have a clarke mig welder. I like it fine. It's Italian made.
Bob R.

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75 II Ghia
77 II FB

IP: 206.196.125.58

67stang
Esteemed Member

Posts: 402
From:Lynn Haven FL
Registered: Jun 99

posted 10-05-2000 10:19 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 67stang   Click Here to Email 67stang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
what do you mean with the outdoor remark, DOING the welding outdoors or welding things that will be outdoors(exposed to the elements)?

Diggedirt, What I mean is Mig welding with Argon outside is hard to do with a breeze. The argon just doesn't stick around. That is why I use flux core wire. Anything left in the elements will rust unless properly protected, as we all well know.

I do all my welding outdoors as I have no garage or workshop so wind is a condition I have to deal with. Flux core wire is best suited for for these conditions.

Mig is the way to go to do vehicle work. Simple as that. That is not all I do, so I have had to learn all the different processes. Trust me, a mig won't work as well as an arc welder on my backhoe.

One more thing, take your time and practice. You will catch on with a Mig welder pretty quickly. It is easy to do. But don't get frustrated with it (easier said than done). Take your time, you'll do great.

ps - try to get a unit with a high duty cycle.

[This message has been edited by 67stang (edited 10-05-2000).]

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