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Author Topic:   Towing and Weight Capacities
Harjula
Journeyman

Posts: 2
From: Manchester, NH, USA
Registered: Jun 99

posted 04-07-2002 11:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Harjula   Click Here to Email Harjula     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As the proud new owner of a 1999 F-150 Ext. Cab,4.6 V8 4x4 Triton, I am attempting to decipher the owner's manual as to the maximum tongue weight, towing weight and carrying capacity of my truck.
The owner's manual is less than helpful,
regardless of how many times I re-read it.
The GVWR is 6250 lbs.
The front GAWR is 3400 lbs.
The rear GAWR is 3550 lbs.
The bumper has a rating of 500 lbs, tongue,
5000 lbs towing.
I have a Putnam receiver on it, that is labeled Class 3 and Class 4.
How much weight can I tow with the receiver?
How much tongue weight can I tow with the receiver?
How much weight can I put in the bed, IE dirt and stone?
I am also looking for some sort of cover to protect the electrical contacts against
further corrosion.
Thanks in advance for your time.

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SteveLaRiviere
Administrator

Posts: 36138
From: Saco, Maine
Registered: May 99

posted 04-08-2002 07:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SteveLaRiviere   Click Here to Email SteveLaRiviere     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That's weird... I have a brother-in-law named Harjula that lives in Manchester New Hampshire that just bought a '99 F-150 XLT Extended Cab... Imagine that!

------------------

'70 Mustang Mach 1 M code 351C 4V/FMX/3.25 open
'72 Mustang Sprint Coupe 351C 4V/FMX/4.30 Trac Lok
'94 F-150 XL 5.8L/E4OD/3.55 Limited Slip

MCA Member # 47773

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MLariviere
Moderator

Posts: 3578
From: Biddeford,Me.USA
Registered: May 99

posted 04-08-2002 09:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MLariviere   Click Here to Email MLariviere     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hey,big H,welcome to Fordland! I hope you have a pleasant stay.

Your hitch is a typical class3/4, which means it will take 500/5000# with a regular hitch,and 750/6500{?}# with a weight distributing hitch.A w/d hitch has 2bars from it which extend forward about 3 feet,under the truck. It puts some of the downforce from the tongue further up the truck's frame. You should be able to pull a trailer with a small car easily.

The payload is the weight left when you subtract the curb weight from the GVWR. The curb on your truck is close to 5000#,so the payload would be 1250#. It would be listed on the origional window sticker,if you have it,as a payload package #1 or 2.{most likely #1}

The GVWR{gross vehicle weight rating} is the total weight the truck can be,loaded,passengers,fuel,etc.

The GAWR{gross axle weight rating} is the limit for that axle. Your front axle would carry a light duty plow,such as a Fisher LD 7 or 7.5,but not a rugular duty{RD} plow.

The rear is a little more complicated. When towing, you have to factor in the payload in the bed. The tongue# also is part of the GAWR. So,say you have a dirt bike,about 500#,a trailer with 300# TW,you would have 450# of payload OR tongue weight left.

Did it say a GCWR anywhere? That's your magic number. That would be your GVWR,plus the total weight of your trailer. This is the limit your truck can haul/tow safely.

State laws vary,but here in Me. we are required to have trailer brakes when the trailer exceeds 2000#. Also lights and fenders{I run neither }

As for a wiring harness,Go to a U-haul dealer and get a good one. Stay away from the stuff at discount stores. There are pulg-in harnesses,and the only wiring to be done is a plug in connection and a ground wire to the frame.


Always remember the safety chains.
Always pin the coupling.
NEVER tow in O/D.


Now,if we could just get your wife into a 70's Ford midsize sedan...

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68F100
Gearhead

Posts: 2111
From: Fort Madison, Iowa USA - United We Stand
Registered: Oct 99

posted 04-11-2002 10:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 68F100   Click Here to Email 68F100     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I think Mike hit it on the head there. Just wanted to say welcome to M&M

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67stang
Gearhead

Posts: 1719
From: Lynn Haven FL
Registered: Jun 99

posted 04-13-2002 11:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 67stang   Click Here to Email 67stang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just a note

On those plug in wiring connectors, many of them don't have a ground. Just plug them in and route the towing wires to the rear and go.

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sigtauenus
Gearhead

Posts: 1907
From: Beaufort, SC
Registered: Jun 2000

posted 04-28-2002 10:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for sigtauenus   Click Here to Email sigtauenus     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
ok, this may be dumb question, but why do you never tow in overdrive?

I towed my mustang (on a trailer) from MS to CA, then CA to SC with a 98 Nissan Pathfinder in overdrive the whole way. Did I screw the transmission?

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67stang
Gearhead

Posts: 1719
From: Lynn Haven FL
Registered: Jun 99

posted 04-28-2002 10:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 67stang   Click Here to Email 67stang     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Funny, in my trucks manual it says to tow in OD unless you meet certain criteria....

But it has to do with the strength of the OD gears if I remember right (which I probably don't)

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68F100
Gearhead

Posts: 2111
From: Fort Madison, Iowa USA - United We Stand
Registered: Oct 99

posted 04-29-2002 12:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for 68F100   Click Here to Email 68F100     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I think towing would be ok in OD except in the following example: My dad's S-15 Jimmy (yeah I know ) will shift in and out of OD all the time when under a load. That can't be good on the tranny. Actually, if I'm driving any vehicle with OD on curvy or hilly roads and it wants to constantly shift, I'll just pull it out of OD.

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MLariviere
Moderator

Posts: 3578
From: Biddeford,Me.USA
Registered: May 99

posted 04-29-2002 08:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for MLariviere   Click Here to Email MLariviere     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
when you put a strain on a trans,you are building heat in it. That's when the seals start to burn up. With an OD gear,say .72, you are actually working the trans harder than you need to. Most transmissions out there run with minimal cooling,and now way to monitor them. With a lower gear,you are lessening the load.

As 68 says,when you shift,you are building heat. As one of my rules I use,if I tow under 1000#,I will use OD,If the trans won't hunt.

Around here,I know people who have blown trannys by just carrying a plow in OD.

And last,Is it worth the chance to ruin the trans,to save 2-3 mpg? Running in drive won't hurt a thing,infact it could help burn some carbon off.

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Dad Vishus
Gearhead

Posts: 613
From: Moscow, Iowa, USA
Registered: Dec 2001

posted 05-02-2002 05:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dad Vishus   Click Here to Email Dad Vishus     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I can kindof state 2 examples, rather on opposite ends of the scale.

When we went to Nebraska to buy Kid's Mustang, we decided that since it was to be a one day trip (350 miles each way)and time was an issue that we would take the flatbed trailer and tow with my 98 F150 ext. cab. This made more sense than taking the 28 foot enclosed trailer and towing with the E350 we had at the time.

The flatbed trailer with the 2700 lb. car was no problem although I did put the lift bars on the hitch. I didn't have the traler brakes hooked up and that wasn't a problem either, although I would have preferred to have them working.

The other end is when I wanted to move the big trailer a couple of years ago, just from one spot in the yard to another, it was handier to use my 150 than the van so I hooked it up and even put the lift bars on. The big trailer practically lifted the front wheels off the ground! I would not ever even think of trying to actually tow the enclosed with my 150. The suspension just isn't designed for that much load.

I watch with horrified amusement on the Interstates when I see half ton pickups being used to tow 5th wheel campers or even fair size tag campers. In a wind, they are downright dangerous. Pulling power is one thing, enough suspension is completely another.

Anything in the way of a trailer thats less than 5000 lbs. and 500 lbs. of tongue weight should be no problem for an F150.

Now if you want to talk REAL towing, theres my F350 PSD dually.........

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MLariviere
Moderator

Posts: 3578
From: Biddeford,Me.USA
Registered: May 99

posted 05-02-2002 09:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MLariviere   Click Here to Email MLariviere     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yep,there never is a big enough truck,is there/

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