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Author Topic:   New engine High oil press.......Alex
MAV
Gearhead

Posts: 209
From: Macon,Georgia, U.S.A.
Registered: Mar 2002

posted 02-08-2003 04:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MAV   Click Here to Email MAV     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well my new 308 street/strip motor is running and I`ve driven it around for about 10 miles so far and all is well except my oil pressure may be too high.
I put a Melling High volume pump in it that I had on the shelf (new) and now Im wondering if I should have just put a stock one in it.
I have 10w-30 Valvoline in it and when you start it up cold it gets to about 91 psi while warming up at about 1,500 rpm.
After reaching 180 degrees it will be at 58 psi at idle ,and 70psi at 3,000 rpm cruising. If you want an outline of whats done to the engine go to my site at:
http://maverickgrabber.iwarp.com

and click on the 1972 Grabber Maverick link. Thanks alot ya`ll.

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steve'66
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From: Sonoma,CA,USA
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posted 02-08-2003 04:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for steve'66   Click Here to Email steve'66     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That HV pump is costing you h.p. and it's also hard on your distributor's gear. I'd either change it out to a stock pump or run thinner synthetic oil.

SteveW

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Moneymaker
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From: Lyons, IL, USA
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posted 02-08-2003 10:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Moneymaker   Click Here to Email Moneymaker     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Wait until you put a few hours on it.
I run M-68HV's in EVERYTHING!

Do you really think I'm giving up any horsepower?

------------------
Alex Denysenko
Co-Administrator and Moderator

NHRA/IHRA/SRA member and licensed Superstock driver
MCA member# 53321
NHRA and IHRA SS/LA National Record Holder '00,'01,'02,&'03
Fleet of FoMoCo products including 88 ASC McLaren Mustang #28
Professional Manwhore
The Barry of BarrysGrrl

Quote #1: "I never met a magazine mechanic I liked."
Quote #2: "Make sure brain is in gear before engaging mouth!"
Quote #3: "If you can't run with the big dogs, stay on the porch!"
www.moneymakerracing.com

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Moneymaker
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posted 02-08-2003 10:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Moneymaker   Click Here to Email Moneymaker     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
PS, with 10-30 it will be high. Try some 5w30 GTX.

------------------
Alex Denysenko
Co-Administrator and Moderator

NHRA/IHRA/SRA member and licensed Superstock driver
MCA member# 53321
NHRA and IHRA SS/LA National Record Holder '00,'01,'02,&'03
Fleet of FoMoCo products including 88 ASC McLaren Mustang #28
Professional Manwhore
The Barry of BarrysGrrl

Quote #1: "I never met a magazine mechanic I liked."
Quote #2: "Make sure brain is in gear before engaging mouth!"
Quote #3: "If you can't run with the big dogs, stay on the porch!"
www.moneymakerracing.com

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steve'66
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Posts: 8826
From: Sonoma,CA,USA
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posted 02-08-2003 10:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for steve'66   Click Here to Email steve'66     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Moneymaker:
PS, with 10-30 it will be high. Try some 5w30 GTX.


Or even 5-20 like my new truck takes. Hi oil pressure is like hi-blood pressure. It's hard on the pump, so some blood thinning is in order.

Alex, I'd be willing to bet that your engine's have generous bearing clearances, and are not "tight".

SteveW

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Moneymaker
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posted 02-08-2003 10:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Moneymaker   Click Here to Email Moneymaker     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Heh, heh, heh.... And some 0-10 oil don't hurt either.

------------------
Alex Denysenko
Co-Administrator and Moderator

NHRA/IHRA/SRA member and licensed Superstock driver
MCA member# 53321
NHRA and IHRA SS/LA National Record Holder '00,'01,'02,&'03
Fleet of FoMoCo products including 88 ASC McLaren Mustang #28
Professional Manwhore
The Barry of BarrysGrrl

Quote #1: "I never met a magazine mechanic I liked."
Quote #2: "Make sure brain is in gear before engaging mouth!"
Quote #3: "If you can't run with the big dogs, stay on the porch!"
www.moneymakerracing.com

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MAV
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Posts: 209
From: Macon,Georgia, U.S.A.
Registered: Mar 2002

posted 02-08-2003 11:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MAV   Click Here to Email MAV     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Oh yea, my clearances are right in the middle of what the specs are for a performance/street engine...uuuuum... cant remember of the top of my head right this minute what that is! (duh)
I think I`ll go with the thinner oil and see what happens. Alex I was a little surprised to hear you reccomend Castrol GTX!
Not that I think theres anything wrong with it but, Nearly every racer I know runs Valvoline or royal purple.

------------------
http://maverickgrabber.iwarp.com

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Moneymaker
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posted 02-08-2003 11:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Moneymaker   Click Here to Email Moneymaker     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Ya gotta break it in first SILLY!

LOL

------------------
Alex Denysenko
Co-Administrator and Moderator

NHRA/IHRA/SRA member and licensed Superstock driver
MCA member# 53321
NHRA and IHRA SS/LA National Record Holder '00,'01,'02,&'03
Fleet of FoMoCo products including 88 ASC McLaren Mustang #28
Professional Manwhore
The Barry of BarrysGrrl

Quote #1: "I never met a magazine mechanic I liked."
Quote #2: "Make sure brain is in gear before engaging mouth!"
Quote #3: "If you can't run with the big dogs, stay on the porch!"
www.moneymakerracing.com

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MAV
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Posts: 209
From: Macon,Georgia, U.S.A.
Registered: Mar 2002

posted 02-08-2003 11:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MAV   Click Here to Email MAV     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yea I meant after its broken in when I change the oil By the way how many miles would you drive it before changing the oil and "gettin on it"? I usually run a street
engine about 300,then change the oil,then run it another 700, change the oil and then drive it like its stolen.

------------------
http://maverickgrabber.iwarp.com

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steve'66
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From: Sonoma,CA,USA
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posted 02-09-2003 12:42 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for steve'66   Click Here to Email steve'66     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Mav,

I'd change it now to some 5w20 or 30. Usually once you've done the 20 minute cam breakin is the time for the first oil change. Good luck with it,

SteveW

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Moneymaker
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posted 02-09-2003 12:42 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Moneymaker   Click Here to Email Moneymaker     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I meant you have to break it in before you can switch to RP Mike.

------------------
Alex Denysenko
Co-Administrator and Moderator

NHRA/IHRA/SRA member and licensed Superstock driver
MCA member# 53321
NHRA and IHRA SS/LA National Record Holder '00,'01,'02,&'03
Fleet of FoMoCo products including 88 ASC McLaren Mustang #28
Professional Manwhore
The Barry of BarrysGrrl

Quote #1: "I never met a magazine mechanic I liked."
Quote #2: "Make sure brain is in gear before engaging mouth!"
Quote #3: "If you can't run with the big dogs, stay on the porch!"
www.moneymakerracing.com

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MAV
Gearhead

Posts: 209
From: Macon,Georgia, U.S.A.
Registered: Mar 2002

posted 02-09-2003 12:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for MAV   Click Here to Email MAV     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks for your input Steve ,I have a used hydrolic roller in this engine,so I did`nt
do the usual 20 minute thing.

------------------
http://maverickgrabber.iwarp.com

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steve'66
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From: Sonoma,CA,USA
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posted 02-09-2003 11:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for steve'66   Click Here to Email steve'66     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It sure is nice not to have to break the cam in isn't it. Especially the bigger cams that require single springs for break-in.

SteveW

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Moneymaker
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posted 02-09-2003 11:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Moneymaker   Click Here to Email Moneymaker     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Break in the cam?
What's that?

------------------
Alex Denysenko
Co-Administrator and Moderator

NHRA/IHRA/SRA member and licensed Superstock driver
MCA member# 53321
NHRA and IHRA SS/LA National Record Holder '00,'01,'02,&'03
Fleet of FoMoCo products including 88 ASC McLaren Mustang #28
Professional Manwhore
The Barry of BarrysGrrl

Quote #1: "I never met a magazine mechanic I liked."
Quote #2: "Make sure brain is in gear before engaging mouth!"
Quote #3: "If you can't run with the big dogs, stay on the porch!"
www.moneymakerracing.com

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DidgeyTrucker
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Posts: 1190
From: Greenbrier, TN USA
Registered: Oct 99

posted 02-09-2003 11:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for DidgeyTrucker   Click Here to Email DidgeyTrucker     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The '73 429 in my '78 F-150 has 200,000 miles on it. THe Mellings HV oil pump I put in when I built it will give me 12 psi in drive at idle and about 45 psi at 70mph. I run Pennzoil 20W-50.

Tracy

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cobravenom71
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Posts: 901
From: Kissimee, Fl USA
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posted 02-10-2003 01:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for cobravenom71   Click Here to Email cobravenom71     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
No one has ever been able to conclusively prove that a HV oil pump offers any advantage over a stock one, or that a HV pump causes any mechanical harm.
There HAS been verifiable proof however that in a street-type engine (read: NOT a RACE MOTOR), a HV oil pump will most definately rob a typical engine of a small amount of power, and cause slightly higher fuel consumption.
I have run both, and I have never noticed a difference one way or the other.

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Moneymaker
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posted 02-10-2003 01:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Moneymaker   Click Here to Email Moneymaker     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Somebody better hurry up and tell Melling before they go broke!


------------------
Alex Denysenko
Co-Administrator and Moderator

NHRA/IHRA/SRA member and licensed Superstock driver
MCA member# 53321
NHRA and IHRA SS/LA National Record Holder '00,'01,'02,&'03
Fleet of FoMoCo products including 88 ASC McLaren Mustang #28
Professional Manwhore
The Barry of BarrysGrrl

Quote #1: "I never met a magazine mechanic I liked."
Quote #2: "Make sure brain is in gear before engaging mouth!"
Quote #3: "If you can't run with the big dogs, stay on the porch!"
www.moneymakerracing.com

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bluestreek
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Posts: 1724
From: Athens,GA
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 02-10-2003 09:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for bluestreek   Click Here to Email bluestreek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Does anyone know why they don't sell a high volume/stock pressure pump? Is that what a stock pump is? You can get a high volume or high pressure, but both deliver over 80 psi. By the way, I used a standard Fomoco 289 pump in my 331 and it idles at 40 psi and tops out at 60 psi with 10W30.

------------------
1966 Mustang Coupe: Custom glass hood and BIG scoop sits atop a 289 stroked to 331 c.i., Steel crank and girdle, 5.4 H-beams, Forged slugs, ported TFS alum. heads, ported Stealth 8020 intake, CompCams Xtreme Solid Roller, Holley 750 HP, long tubes, 4speed, 9" 3.50 posi, BFG Drag radials..

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Mpcoluv
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From: Charlotte NC usa
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posted 02-10-2003 10:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mpcoluv   Click Here to Email Mpcoluv     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by bluestreek:
Does anyone know why they don't sell a high volume/stock pressure pump? Is that what a stock pump is? You can get a high volume or high pressure, but both deliver over 80 psi. By the way, I used a standard Fomoco 289 pump in my 331 and it idles at 40 psi and tops out at 60 psi with 10W30.


Because High Volume/High Pressure pumps will empty the oil pan by pumping all the oil to the top end.

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steve'66
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From: Sonoma,CA,USA
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posted 02-10-2003 10:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for steve'66   Click Here to Email steve'66     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here's a clip from Reher-Morison's site,

When you're looking for maximum power, it's important not to have too much oil circulating in the crankcase, especially with a wet-sump system. Like ring drag, windage is a parasitic loss that reduces the power that's available to accelerate the car. A common mistake is to order the biggest, baddest oil pump in the catalog. We use a standard volume pump because we know from our flow tests that a standard pump provides adequate lubrication for our sportsman engines. That's because we machine and assemble our cranks and rods with minimum side clearance and restrict the flow of oil to the top end. The clearance between the rods and crankshaft cheeks greatly affects the total oil flow, much like a metering jet. Wrist pin galling is usually the first sign of inadequate oil flow.

You can check out all their tech articles at
http://www.rehermorrison.com/

That was from Tech Talk Article #33


SteveW

[This message has been edited by steve'66 (edited 02-10-2003).]

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bluestreek
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From: Athens,GA
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posted 02-10-2003 11:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for bluestreek   Click Here to Email bluestreek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I read somewhere (don't remember the link) that Nascar has been gradually dropping the pressure to their engines down to 50 psi in the last couple of years. If they can run an engine with these pressures at 7000-9000 rpms for 500 miles then it must be OK. I agree that more time has to be put into clearances, windage, and oilpan design than worrying about how much volume or pressure you can force through the engine. I lost a good engine once, not because of low oil pressure, but because the pan went dry from using a high volume pump. I'll never use one again!

------------------
1966 Mustang Coupe: Custom glass hood and BIG scoop sits atop a 289 stroked to 331 c.i., Steel crank and girdle, 5.4 H-beams, Forged slugs, ported TFS alum. heads, ported Stealth 8020 intake, CompCams Xtreme Solid Roller, Holley 750 HP, long tubes, 4speed, 9" 3.50 posi, BFG Drag radials..

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Moneymaker
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posted 02-11-2003 12:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Moneymaker   Click Here to Email Moneymaker     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
And to think we used to run an extra quart of oil and 50 wt at that.

------------------
Alex Denysenko
Co-Administrator and Moderator

NHRA/IHRA/SRA member and licensed Superstock driver
MCA member# 53321
NHRA and IHRA SS/LA National Record Holder '00,'01,'02,&'03
Fleet of FoMoCo products including 88 ASC McLaren Mustang #28
Professional Manwhore
The Barry of BarrysGrrl

Quote #1: "I never met a magazine mechanic I liked."
Quote #2: "Make sure brain is in gear before engaging mouth!"
Quote #3: "If you can't run with the big dogs, stay on the porch!"
www.moneymakerracing.com

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bluestreek
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From: Athens,GA
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posted 02-11-2003 09:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for bluestreek   Click Here to Email bluestreek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Moneymaker:
And to think we used to run an extra quart of oil and 50 wt at that.


I changed my way of thinking on oil weights a few years ago, when my 170K mi. truck engine developed a little noise on real cold startups even with 70 psi oil pressure. I was already using Synthetic oil in my racecar so I decided to switch from ol
Castrol 10W40 to synthetic10W30 in the truck. The oil pressure dropped 10 psi, but the noise went away altogther. It now has 270K mi. and is still running strong and uses no oil!
The science of engine lubrication has come a long way in the last ten years. I only recommend 50wt to my heavy Chebbie buddies.

------------------
1966 Mustang Coupe: Custom glass hood and BIG scoop sits atop a 289 stroked to 331 c.i., Steel crank and girdle, 5.4 H-beams, Forged slugs, ported TFS alum. heads, ported Stealth 8020 intake, CompCams Xtreme Solid Roller, Holley 750 HP, long tubes, 4speed, 9" 3.50 posi, BFG Drag radials..

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Moneymaker
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posted 02-11-2003 10:18 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Moneymaker   Click Here to Email Moneymaker     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Oh yeah I forgot, AND a can of STP!
Bearing always looked good though.
I just imagine how fast we could have been back then if we only used a lighter oil and no STP. (sigh)

------------------
Alex Denysenko
Co-Administrator and Moderator

NHRA/IHRA/SRA member and licensed Superstock driver
MCA member# 53321
NHRA and IHRA SS/LA National Record Holder '00,'01,'02,&'03
Fleet of FoMoCo products including 88 ASC McLaren Mustang #28
Professional Manwhore
The Barry of BarrysGrrl

Quote #1: "I never met a magazine mechanic I liked."
Quote #2: "Make sure brain is in gear before engaging mouth!"
Quote #3: "If you can't run with the big dogs, stay on the porch!"
www.moneymakerracing.com

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kid vishus
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From: middle of NC
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posted 02-11-2003 10:19 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for kid vishus   Click Here to Email kid vishus     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by bluestreek:
I read somewhere (don't remember the link) that Nascar has been gradually dropping the pressure to their engines down to 50 psi in the last couple of years. If they can run an engine with these pressures at 7000-9000 rpms for 500 miles then it must be OK. I agree that more time has to be put into clearances, windage, and oilpan design than worrying about how much volume or pressure you can force through the engine.



That's a tuff comparison to make. They are running I would guess a 5 stage dry sump. Therefore there is actually very little oil in the pan.

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bluestreek
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From: Athens,GA
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posted 02-11-2003 11:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for bluestreek   Click Here to Email bluestreek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
You're right about the high-tech oil system and also special bearing materials and clearances used in Nascar. But it still amazed me to find out that they were experimenting with lower pressures and viscosities at those RPM levels. Like Alex said, I used to be a believer in thick oil and STP myself, but over the years have learned from trial and error that it was only a VERY TEMPORARY solution. The more STP you used... the more you needed!!

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1966 Mustang Coupe: Custom glass hood and BIG scoop sits atop a 289 stroked to 331 c.i., Steel crank and girdle, 5.4 H-beams, Forged slugs, ported TFS alum. heads, ported Stealth 8020 intake, CompCams Xtreme Solid Roller, Holley 750 HP, long tubes, 4speed, 9" 3.50 posi, BFG Drag radials..

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Daniel Jones
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From: St. Louis, MO
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posted 02-13-2003 04:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Daniel Jones   Click Here to Email Daniel Jones     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
> Does anyone know why they don't sell a high volume/stock pressure pump?

Because it would offer little benefit. An oil pump is a positive displacement
pump with the rotors sweeping out a fixed volume of oil each revolution. Spin
the pump twice as fast, get twice the flow rate of oil. Pressure is a by-
product of that flow into a restriction (bearings, oil galleries, etc.).
Along the way, the pressure drops wherever oil flow is bled off but the
maximum supply pressure an oil pump can provide is set by a spring-loaded
bypass valve. Once the oil pressure exceeds the spring pressure, the bypass
opens and the excesss flow is returned to the oil pan. When this happens,
little or no additional flow reaches the bearings. Note that some pumps will
reach their maximum output at a relatively low RPM, say 2000 to 2500 RPM.
Also note that flow always seeks the path of least resistance. If there is
no resistance, there is no pressure increase. For instance, if you break a
pushrod in a 351C and the lifter pops out of place, a big hole is opened
in the oil gallery that provide little restriction and oil pressure plummets
like a rock. Over an engine's life, as bearings wear, restriction opens
and oil pressure will be reduced. Also, as the oil pump wears, it may not
sweep out as much oil (leaks it out).

So much for pump output. Now what does an engine need (more specifically
what do engine bearings need)? The goal of pressure fed lubrication is
to float the rotating bits (rods, mains) in a film of oil so they don't
touch on and wear against the stationary metal bits. The amount of
lubrication pressure required is proportional to load and load goes up
with RPM, so you want an increasing pressure with RPM. Smokey's old rule
of thumb for Chevys was 10 psi per 1000 RPM. Load also goes up with power
output. An engine making 200 HP at 2000 RPM requires more lubrication than
one making 50 HP at the same RPM. What an individaul engine needs depends
upon a lot of factors (bearing clearance, bearing diameters, bearing widths,
oil pathways, leakage points, RPM, properties of the oil being used,
temperature, how long the engine has to operate at a given RPM, etc.).
If the engine is a bleeder, oil pressure at the rear bearings can be much
less than at the front. In cases like that, you may need to increase the
pump output (via a high volume pump) to compensate and/or restrict oil
(via precisely metered restrictors in the oil galleries).

A high volume pump simply has larger (typically longer) rotors. A high
pressure pump simply has a stiffer spring (can also be a shimmed spring).
A high pressure/high volume oil pump has both. Anyway, back to your original
question. A high volume, low pressure pump would simply open the bypass
at an earlier RPM where the flow is likely not required but would not
provide the needed pressure at higher RPM. Better would be a standard
volume pump with high pressure relief spring which would give low pressure
and flow at low RPM and high pressure and flow at high RPM. However,
depending upon the engine and usage, a standard volume high pressure pump
might not provide enough flow. In those cases, a high volume and high
pressure pump is required. I can think of several situations where one
might be of benefit. One is to provide adequate oil pressure over the life
of an engine. New, the pump might be overkill but, as the engine (and oil
pump itself) wears, the high volume pump may provide a measure of safety.
Alternatively, you can run a heavier weight oil on high mileage engines.
Another is for engines that run at elevated RPM for long periods of time,
like circle track or endurance racing, where oil temperature climbs and
pressure drops. When the oil starts to get hot and thins out (like it
might near the end of a race) the deeper gears are able to sweep out a
larger volume of the thinner oil, providing better lubrication. A guy I
know in Europe has a Pantera and has this problem. He can run 130+ MPH
for long periods of time on the Autobahns and Autostradas but 10 minutes
or so into a run his oil temperature starts creeping up and the oil pressure
starts dropping. He ends up having to limit his RPM to keep temperatures
and pressures in check. A high volume, high pressure pump would be a help
there, as would a good oil cooler. A taller final drive ratio wouldn't hurt
either. Another application where high volume and pressure might be of use
would be supercharged and turbocharged engines which can make greater power
at relatively (compared to normally aspirated engines of equivalent size)
low RPM. Long stroke stroker motors might also fall into this category.
Also, any accessory that puts an additional demand on the oiling system would
be a candidate for a high volume and high pressure pump. Examples would be
external oil coolers and superchargers which feed off an engine's oil supply.

Understand that high pressure and high volume volume are relative terms.
With the stock oil pump, the bypass in my little 215 cube Buick aluminum V8
opens at only 33 lbs while my sister's old Mitsubishi would put out over 100
PSI. A high volume/high pressure oil pump for a Buick 215 might be considered
a standard volume pump in a 351C. For a specific engine, you realy have to
defer to experience. Do engines like yours, when used in a manner similar
to the way you plan to use it, exhibit wear or failure patterns that might
benefit from increased lubrication. High volume pumps are standard issue
on performance FE's and I know Alex mentioned that every small block Ford he
builds gets a Melling high volume pump and that's on a Windsor which has
about the cleanest oiling system I've seen on a domestic V8. Alex, is your
preference for high volume pumps to help out at high rpm or as clearances
open as the engine wears or ???

If contemplating a high volume pump, you may want to consider a gated and
baffled oil pan with greater than stock capacity. The trickest pump in the
world won't save you if the oil sloshes away from the pick-up and sucks air.
One of the guys in the Pantera club learned the hard way that a stock Pantera
can pull 1G on a set of slicks. He also learned the oil will climb the side
of the pan and starve the pick-up, resulting in a spun bearing. After
rebuilding the engine, he now runs a flat bottom 10 quart road race gated
and baffled oil pan. Pay attention to drain back as well. You can elongate
and smooth the drain holes and valley. The old Boss 302 Trans Am motors even
ran drain lines from the valve covers to the pan.

Dan Jones

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Moneymaker
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posted 02-14-2003 10:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Moneymaker   Click Here to Email Moneymaker     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Man Dan, you sure like to type!

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Alex Denysenko
Co-Administrator and Moderator

NHRA/IHRA/SRA member and licensed Superstock driver
MCA member# 53321
NHRA and IHRA SS/LA National Record Holder '00,'01,'02,&'03
Fleet of FoMoCo products including 88 ASC McLaren Mustang #28
Professional Manwhore
The Barry of BarrysGrrl

Quote #1: "I never met a magazine mechanic I liked."
Quote #2: "Make sure brain is in gear before engaging mouth!"
Quote #3: "If you can't run with the big dogs, stay on the porch!"
www.moneymakerracing.com

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64FalconF-16
Gearhead

Posts: 196
From: Republic Of Texas!! Temporarily living in KY
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 02-14-2003 06:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 64FalconF-16   Click Here to Email 64FalconF-16     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Moneymaker:
Man Dan, you sure like to type!


BaaaHAAAA!!! LMFAO!!!

Sorry Dan, but Alex this is the funniest comment I have seen yet!!!!

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jsracingbbf
Gearhead

Posts: 2751
From: Batesville,MS. , U.S.A.
Registered: Mar 2002

posted 02-14-2003 06:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for jsracingbbf   Click Here to Email jsracingbbf     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
good call Dan, you hit it right on the money.

------------------
Jerry
69 Mustang Pro ET Drag
70 Mustang retired former footbrake car
"This is FORD Country! On a Quiet night you can hear a Chevy Rust"

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