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Author Topic:   breaking in an engine
sic67coug
Gearhead

Posts: 189
From: clearlake california
Registered: Dec 2002

posted 02-06-2003 11:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for sic67coug   Click Here to Email sic67coug     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
when you build an engine from top to bottom whats the proper way to break it in? does it matter if its stock or modified? let me know

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D&S Induction Systems
Gearhead

Posts: 118
From: Columbia Heights Mn U.S.A.
Registered: Feb 2003

posted 02-07-2003 01:31 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for D&S Induction Systems   Click Here to Email D&S Induction Systems     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This is a print out we send with our crate engines. We also have a differnt one for all out racing engines.(or no cooling system engines)

D&S INDUCTION SYSTEMS

We would first like to thank you for choosing D&S Induction. The following information is our recommended start up and break in procedure on you’re new engine. Following these steps will ensure you’re engine will be broke in correctly.

STEP 1
Do a complete fluid check. Make sure the oil is in the the engine, oil filter is installed and radiator is topped with coolant. Remember, after you start the engine for the first time the coolant will be pumped into the block. So be sure and have extra coolant on hand, and add as needed. Also, remember to check all fastener. (ie. hose clamps)

STEP 2
If installed, remove the distributor, and prime the oiling system. Install distributor.

Now you are ready to start you’re engine for the first time. (we recommend you have an oil pressure gauge and engine temperature gauge installed at this point.)

Check list:
a) engine has oil
b) engine has coolant
c) all fastener are tight
d) extra coolant is on hand
e) distributor is installed
f) fuel is in tank

STEP 3
Now check you’re ignition system. Do this quick and simple test. Pull the coil wire off of the distributor. Install a spark plug or spark tester in the end of the wire. Ground the spark plug or tester to the (ie. manifold, block) Keeping you’re hands free, have someone turn the engine over for aprox. 1-2 seconds. Since you are testing directly off the ignition coil this will be enough time to see if you’re ignition system is working. If it does work to you’re satisfaction, reinstall the coil wire back on the distributor and you’re test is now complete.

STEP 4
Every thing should now be ready to go. If you have an electric fuel pump, turn it on, and manually move the throttle plate back and fourth, while looking to see if fuel is squirting out of the accelerator pump nozzles. If you have a mechanical fuel pump, you will need to provide fuel to the engine until the fuel can be pumped to the carburetor. This can be done with a small gas can, coffee can, or any thing that can safely hold gasoline. (remember you don’t need allot)

Also, try and set the distributor between 0 and 15 degrees BTDC. Remember to keep the distributor loose enough to turn while the engine is running

STEP 5
Check list:
a) ignition is in working order
b) fuel is in carburetor (electric pump) some fuel was poured down into carburetor (mechanical pump)
c) timing is set close to 0-15 BTDC

OK! IT’S TIME...FIRE IT UP!

If it does not start...DON’T PANIC...ASK YOU’RE SELF THESE THINGS.

a) AIR......................................Is something preventing air from entering the engine?
b) FUEL...................................Is there fuel? Or is there too much fuel?
c) SPARK.................................Is the ignition system working?
d) COMPRESSION..................Are all of the spark plugs in?

Also Check...

a) Make sure you’re firing order is correct
b) Pull cap off of distributor and crank engine. Make sure distributor is turning.
c) Make sure you’re timing is NOT too far off. This is how it’s done...
1) Disconnect coil wire to distributor.
2) Pull #1 spark plug out.
3) Put you’re finger in #1 spark plug hole.
4) Use a remote starter or have a friend crank the the engine until you feel a heavy push on
you’re finger. (this is the compression stroke) As soon as you feel this STOP CRANKING!
(DO NOT STICK YOU’RE FINGER WAY DOWN INTO THE SPARK PLUG HOLE. IT
COULD COME IN CONTACT WITH THE PISTON. JUST SIMPLY COVER IT UP.)
5) Manually crank the engine until you see “0” on the harmonic balance and the timing pointer
line up. (this is now top dead center compression stroke)
6) Now remove the distributor cap and look to see ware the rotor is pointed. The rotor should be
pointed toward the #1 tremanal on the disrtibuter cap. If it is not, then make the necessary
adjustments so it is.
Another method of checking for Top Dead Center:
1) Disconnect coil wire to distributor.
2) Remove the valve cover on the bank number 1 cylinder is located.
3) Crank the engine and watch the # 1 cylinder’s rocker arms. When both springs are completely
uncompressed this will be close to Top Dead Center.
5) Manually crank the engine until you see “0” on the harmonic balance and the timing pointer
line up. (this is now top dead center compression stroke)
6) Now remove the distributor cap and look to see ware the rotor is pointed. The rotor should be
pointed toward the #1 tremanal on the disrtibuter cap. If it is not, then make the necessary
adjustment so it is.


AFTER THE ENGINE HAS STARTED
STEP 6
a) Be sure to check the oil pressure gauge to see if the engine is getting oil pressure.
b) Constantly monitor the the engine temperature gauge.
c) Add coolant as necessary.
d) This is also a good time to check and set timing, and tune carburetor. You may need to do this to
get the engine to idle.
e) Once the engine had reached operating temperature (190-210 degrees) and has maintained it for at least 3 minutes, shut it off. You should now look for these things.
(NOTE: Do NOT let the engine reach 220 degrees and above.)
1) Any leaks: (ie. oil, coolant, transmition fluid)
2) Is the upper radiator hose hot? (if it is, this will indicate you’re thermostat is working correctly.)
3) Does the upper radiator hose have pressure in it? (If it does, this will indicate you’re cooling
system holds pressure.
4) Check oil level.

STEP 7
“BREAK IN PROCEDURE”
Once you are satisfied that everything is in good working order, and there are no leaks, restart the engine. At this point, you can take this time to do some pre-tuning. This is basicly tuning the engine well enough to go the the first test drive. This could consist of jets, timing, and carburetor tuning.

Once the engine idles down, is responsive to throttle movement and revs-up well, it is now time to break in the cam. (NOTE: Do NOT over rev the engine just yet. You’re engine is still in the pre-break in stage. Try and keep the RPM’S below 3500)

STEP 8 “CAM BREAK IN”
Simply run the engine at 2000-2500 RPM’S for 20 minutes. After this point, tuirn the engine OFF and change the oil and oil filter!!

STEP 9 “BREAK IN PEIORD”
You are now ready for the first test drive. Start off by running the engine at lower RPM’S. Drive it for 20 minutes like you would a “normal car”. Then very the engine speed. Example: If you’re engines “red line” is 7000 RPM’S, run it from idle to 5500-6000 RPM’S. After you have 50 to 75 miles on the engine, an occatinal 7000 RPM buirst won’t huirt. Do this for 300 to 500 miles.

In this 300 to 500 mile “break in period”, you’re engine will, run better and gain power while the piston rings break in. Just remember not to beat on it too much in this stage.

Contunue to tune you’re engine as you go. You may want to try carburetor adjustments, distributer spring adjustments, carburetor sapcers, rocker arm adjustments, etc...
(NOTE: Do NOT use nitrous oxide in the break in peiord)

STEP 10
After you have put you’re first 300 to 500 miles on the engine, be shure to change the oil!. At this point is is now safe to run you’re engine at and up to the engines “redline”. The engines piston rings and bearings should be completly broke in at this point. It is also now ok to run our recomended amount of nitrous oxide on you’re engine.

PS: This is the un-proof read version. Sorry for any errors.


[This message has been edited by D&S Induction Systems (edited 02-07-2003).]

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SteveLaRiviere
Administrator

Posts: 43151
From: Saco, Maine
Registered: May 99

posted 02-07-2003 08:20 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SteveLaRiviere   Click Here to Email SteveLaRiviere     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Your step 8 should be step 6, IMO. The way it reads makes me think you want them to start it up and let it idle for a while before you run the cam in.

Good for camshaft sales, though...

------------------
'70 Mustang Mach 1 - '72 Mustang Sprint - '94 F-150

Please remember our sponsors,
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bluestreek
Gearhead

Posts: 1724
From: Athens,GA
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 02-07-2003 11:31 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for bluestreek   Click Here to Email bluestreek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have to agree with SteveLaRiviere. Step 8 should be included in step 6 with flat-tappet cams. I have seen many flat tappet cams die after 3 minute shutdowns. Get it running quicly as possible, and keep it running safely between 2000-2500 rpms for at least 20 minutes by any means possible! As the engine is running and the wear pattern starts being established, it's very important for the cam to stay lubed and stay up to temperature to be work hardened.

------------------
1966 Mustang Coupe: Custom glass hood and BIG scoop sits atop a 289 stroked to 331 c.i., Steel crank and girdle, 5.4 H-beams, Forged slugs, ported TFS alum. heads, ported Stealth 8020 intake, CompCams Xtreme Solid Roller, Holley 750 HP, long tubes, 4speed, 9" 3.50 posi, BFG Drag radials..

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Moneymaker
Administrator

Posts: 25883
From: Lyons, IL, USA
Registered: May 99

posted 02-07-2003 11:51 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Moneymaker   Click Here to Email Moneymaker     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Anyone ever hear the expression "spare the rod, and spoil the child"?

This is all well and good for a stock street engine I guess, or if you are a novice.
Maybe I'm just jaded as I don't let my customers start anything I build and I usually don't have any issues when I fire up a fresh piece..

Good advice overall nevertheless.

------------------
Alex Denysenko
Co-Administrator and Moderator

NHRA/IHRA/SRA member and licensed Superstock driver
MCA member# 53321
NHRA and IHRA SS/LA National Record Holder '00,'01,'02,&'03
Fleet of FoMoCo products including 88 ASC McLaren Mustang #28
Professional Manwhore
The Barry of BarrysGrrl

Quote #1: "I never met a magazine mechanic I liked."
Quote #2: "Make sure brain is in gear before engaging mouth!"
Quote #3: "If you can't run with the big dogs, stay on the porch!"
www.moneymakerracing.com

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Ryan Wilke
Gearhead

Posts: 2060
From: Stanton, Michigan 49707
Registered: Oct 2000

posted 02-07-2003 01:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ryan Wilke   Click Here to Email Ryan Wilke     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
D&S:
I hope you don't take any offense, because your 'break in sheet info' touches on many, many necessary points. Review and discussion of it makes us all smarter.

-- Getting the 300-500 miles recommended in STEPS 9 & 10 is fine for a STREET-DRIVEN car. But I'd guess your recommendations would be different for a car/engine that is going to be operated "1/4 mile at a time"......

I noticed you didn't mention anything about checking the torque on the heads, intake and exhaust manifold/headers.... (unless that is a part of the STEP 9: "Continue tuning,,etc.")

-- Have folks quit doing that since we typically are using better quality gaskets nowadays?

Ryan

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D&S Induction Systems
Gearhead

Posts: 118
From: Columbia Heights Mn U.S.A.
Registered: Feb 2003

posted 02-07-2003 06:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for D&S Induction Systems   Click Here to Email D&S Induction Systems     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Ryan Wilke I take no offense at all. I think the feed back is great!

I agree the cam should be broke in as soon an possable but before it is we recomend a complete systems check. If you don't do this kind of thing often like alot of you do, important stemps can be overlooked resulting in expensive mistakes.

A freind buirned up a brand new 396 chev because he forgot to continue to add coolant. He just filled it up and took off down the street!!

Yes, this print out we give with our street street/strip and weekend cruser type engines.

We send a differnt one with racing engines and engines w/o a cooling system. Some of the stuff you read is in the racing version, but the break in and a few other things are differnt.

Thanks agen for the feed back.

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289u4ea
Journeyman

Posts: 53
From: Pleasanton, CA
Registered: May 2000

posted 02-07-2003 07:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 289u4ea   Click Here to Email 289u4ea     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I also do not want to be critical, but a note of caution. In step 4: "If you have a mechanical fuel pump, you will need to provide fuel to the engine until the fuel can be pumped to the carburetor. This can be done with a small gas can, coffee can, or any thing that can safely hold gasoline."
I had a friend that was pouring gas into a carb to get the car started. When it back-fired the gas can exploded sending fuel and flames everywhere. He received massive 1st and 2nd degree burns on his face and arms then had to spent along time in the hospital to recover.
There has to be a better way to prime a carb without pouring in raw fuel!
I have used a spray bottle set on squirt or mist without problem, but I won't pour!!

------------------
'65 FB 289

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capri man
Gearhead

Posts: 6417
From: doerun, ga.
Registered: Nov 2000

posted 02-07-2003 08:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for capri man   Click Here to Email capri man     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
on a holley, you can fill the bowls through the vent tubes with a small funnel.

------------------
mike r
racing is real
everything else is just a game.
81 capri-7.51 @89mph 1/8
1.54 60 ft.
http://prestage.com/site/site_display.asp?SiteID=141

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SteveLaRiviere
Administrator

Posts: 43151
From: Saco, Maine
Registered: May 99

posted 02-07-2003 08:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SteveLaRiviere   Click Here to Email SteveLaRiviere     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Prefill the carb, like Mike said. Never pour in fuel as an engine is cranking, that's asking for it. You also pour in too much fuel that way anyhow.

------------------
'70 Mustang Mach 1 - '72 Mustang Sprint - '94 F-150

Please remember our sponsors,
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capri man
Gearhead

Posts: 6417
From: doerun, ga.
Registered: Nov 2000

posted 02-07-2003 08:44 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for capri man   Click Here to Email capri man     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
hey d&s i hope you dont think that we are picking on you. sometimes we just act like a bunch of smart azzes, oh heII we aint acting we are a bunch of smart azzes!!! LOL welcome buddy.

------------------
mike r
racing is real
everything else is just a game.
81 capri-7.51 @89mph 1/8
1.54 60 ft.
http://prestage.com/site/site_display.asp?SiteID=141

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D&S Induction Systems
Gearhead

Posts: 118
From: Columbia Heights Mn U.S.A.
Registered: Feb 2003

posted 02-07-2003 09:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for D&S Induction Systems   Click Here to Email D&S Induction Systems     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
No, I dont mind...Keeps me on my toes.

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Dad Vishus
Gearhead

Posts: 836
From: Moscow, Iowa, USA
Registered: Dec 2001

posted 02-07-2003 10:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dad Vishus   Click Here to Email Dad Vishus     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by 289u4ea:
I also do not want to be critical, but a note of caution. In step 4: "If you have a mechanical fuel pump, you will need to provide fuel to the engine until the fuel can be pumped to the carburetor. This can be done with a small gas can, coffee can, or any thing that can safely hold gasoline."
I had a friend that was pouring gas into a carb to get the car started. When it back-fired the gas can exploded sending fuel and flames everywhere. He received massive 1st and 2nd degree burns on his face and arms then had to spent along time in the hospital to recover.
There has to be a better way to prime a carb without pouring in raw fuel!
I have used a spray bottle set on squirt or mist without problem, but I won't pour!!



I and KV use sport drink bottles of gas to start our alky motors. Dump some in and get the bottle the heck away from the motor before its cranked. If you get a backfire with a spray bottle thats in use at the time, there will be a problem!

We start motors with the timing light hooked up and get that set right away, at least close. No shutting off with solid lifters, nope!

Rollers don't matter.

------------------
63 Falcon 377 Cleveland stroker Flying Toilet alchohol injection. 6.19 @ 110 MPH 1/8 mile
2002 Ranger FX4 daily driver
2000 F350 PSD Crew cab dually - Like commuting in a B52!!
98 US Cargo Phantom II 28'

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mach72
Gearhead

Posts: 129
From: Bixby, Ok. USA
Registered: Jun 99

posted 02-07-2003 11:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mach72     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I always prefer to change the oil after the the initial cam "break-in" (before that first test drive), then again at 500 miles. Then every 3000-4000 miles. The cam-lube that was applied when the cam and lifters were installed is not intended to stay in the engine long-term. I believe that it can stop up the oil filter. What do you guys think about about the old theory "break it in like it will be used". Tom

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D&S Induction Systems
Gearhead

Posts: 118
From: Columbia Heights Mn U.S.A.
Registered: Feb 2003

posted 02-08-2003 02:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for D&S Induction Systems   Click Here to Email D&S Induction Systems     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by mach72:
I always prefer to change the oil after the the initial cam "break-in" (before that first test drive), then again at 500 miles. Then every 3000-4000 miles. The cam-lube that was applied when the cam and lifters were installed is not intended to stay in the engine long-term. I believe that it can stop up the oil filter. What do you guys think about about the old theory "break it in like it will be used". Tom

"STEP 8 “CAM BREAK IN”
Simply run the engine at 2000-2500 RPM’S for 20 minutes. After this point, tuirn the engine OFF and change the oil and oil filter!!"

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V8 Thumper
Gearhead

Posts: 4377
From: Arizona
Registered: Dec 2001

posted 02-08-2003 09:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for V8 Thumper   Click Here to Email V8 Thumper     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Not to simply repeat what others have said, but after priming the oiling system, I too run a flat tappet cam in IMMEDIATELY. No sooner will the motor fire, I bring the rpm's up to 2500+/- and then go immediately to the timing light that I had hooked up and ready to go and (like KV said). I'll have water handy to top off the radiator as necessary. Straight water for now, antifreeze is optional after verifying no leaks. I also like to park a big 24" or 30" industrial fan directly in front of the car to move lots of air across the radiator while running the motor at that rpm range with the car sitting still. If doing a break-in procedure in your garage or driveway, the fan also clears exhaust gasses away from you and your home.

After following your cam manufacturer's break-in procedure, change oil and filter. Then drive it 'like a regular car' for the first 500 miles, followed by another oil and filter change. 1000 miles later, another oil and filter change. 2500-3000 mile service intervals from then on

Some call it old school, but I still use 30W non detergent motor oil for inital start-up and camshaft break-in. Petroleum motor oil (NOT synthetic) for the first 3000 street miles, then fill the crankcase with the good stuff

------------------
1965 GT coupe, 333ci aluminum headed/solid cammed stroker, four speed, 3.70:1 9"

All Blue Oval, no blue bottle
http://mustangsandmore.50megs.com/V8Thumper.html

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V8 Thumper
Gearhead

Posts: 4377
From: Arizona
Registered: Dec 2001

posted 02-08-2003 09:18 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for V8 Thumper   Click Here to Email V8 Thumper     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
On the 30W ND oil subject, have you ever read the fine print on Childs & Albert Piston Ring Assembly Oil? It's (basically) 30W ND oil, super-fine filtered and purified

------------------
1965 GT coupe, 333ci aluminum headed/solid cammed stroker, four speed, 3.70:1 9"

All Blue Oval, no blue bottle
http://mustangsandmore.50megs.com/V8Thumper.html

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Ryan Wilke
Gearhead

Posts: 2060
From: Stanton, Michigan 49707
Registered: Oct 2000

posted 02-10-2003 10:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ryan Wilke   Click Here to Email Ryan Wilke     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by D&S Induction Systems:
....We also have a different one for all out racing engines (or no cooling system engines)....

D&S:
If you don't mind, I'd be interested in seeing your racing engine printout....

Thanks!
Ryan

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