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Author Topic:   Return Fuel Regulator
Randy Wilson
Journeyman

Posts: 21
From: Portland, Or USA
Registered: Feb 2001

posted 01-28-2002 01:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Randy Wilson   Click Here to Email Randy Wilson     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I picked up a return style fuel regulator at a local swap meet, and plan on installing a return line. Most of the people that I talk say return lines enter into the filler neck. Do I need to weld in a tube long enough to go fairly close to the bottom of the tank, or should the fuel dump down the filler neck? I am leaning towards a long tube that extends at least into the middle of the tank. I will be using a Mallory 140 gerotor pump and don't want to create a bunch of vapor problems. Thanks to anyone who's been there/done that. The car is a '70 mustang, so the filler neck is in the middle of the back, and enters the top of the tank.

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n2oMike
Gearhead

Posts: 2831
From: Spencer, WV
Registered: Jan 2001

posted 01-28-2002 09:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for n2oMike   Click Here to Email n2oMike     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The return line does not have to dump into the filler neck... that is totally bogus. It just has to dump into the tank somewhere. I have mine returning near the bottom of the tank. It goes in the front of the tank near the bottom, which is about as far away from the filler neck as you can get. It is quieter that since there is no constant 'waterfall' back there, and all that waterfall would just help all the 'light elements' of the fuel evaporate out.

Good Luck!

------------------
Mike Burch
66 mustang real street
302 4-speed 289 heads
10.63 @ 129.3
http://www.geocities.com/carbedstangs/cmml_mburch.html
http://www.fortunecity.com/silverstone/healey/367

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Larry Jennings
Gearhead

Posts: 540
From: Redwood City, Ca. USA
Registered: Apr 2000

posted 01-28-2002 10:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Larry Jennings   Click Here to Email Larry Jennings     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I've dumped it into the neck on a car with one of them super pricey fuel cells and no way to punch into it. On other cars I've put it into the drain plug of the stock tank. The only thing to watch for is not putting it into the tank close to the pickup where it "might" cause some kind of flow disturbance or aeriation, and I've even bent that rule when there's no other option.
Mike! Have you ever tried leaving your fuel out in the sun with the lid off? The light or low ends you speak of are so the fuel can ignite at low pressure, slow cranking speeds. The light ends use up space in your burnable fuel and do not make good power so by airing your fuel it'll make the car a bit harder to crank but it'll also make your fuel more powerfull per unit, this is a trick among classes where gas is watched very closely so I would imagine Alex can fill in anything about it that I don't know for sure .

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mellowyellow
Gearhead

Posts: 7367
From: So. Fl.
Registered: Aug 2000

posted 01-29-2002 10:17 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mellowyellow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Articles I've seen on running a return line for EFI in an early stang is to run it through the sending unit. Pics show a line brazed or silver soldered in and working well. Mustangs Plus shows it in an installation feature on their web site www.mustangsplus.com and report there is no problem even in running tank low. These articles are about street cars.

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Randy Wilson
Journeyman

Posts: 21
From: Portland, Or USA
Registered: Feb 2001

posted 01-29-2002 01:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Randy Wilson   Click Here to Email Randy Wilson     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I like the idea of going into the sending unit! I have that funky california emmisions tank with the plastic vapor liner along the top (inside tank) and don't want to put any holes in the tank that I don't have to. My tank doesn't have an drain hole, or that would also be a good option. The article you refer to used silver solder, but with a new sending unit, I think I could weld it without getting too much heat into it. I am not too sure which method they used for the sending unit from the factory, but it looks like a nice easy straight forward solution. Thanks for the ideas, Randy.

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n2oMike
Gearhead

Posts: 2831
From: Spencer, WV
Registered: Jan 2001

posted 01-29-2002 03:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for n2oMike   Click Here to Email n2oMike     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Larry Jennings:

Mike! Have you ever tried leaving your fuel out in the sun with the lid off? The light or low ends you speak of are so the fuel can ignite at low pressure, slow cranking speeds. The light ends use up space in your burnable fuel and do not make good power so by airing your fuel it'll make the car a bit harder to crank but it'll also make your fuel more powerfull per unit, this is a trick among classes where gas is watched very closely so I would imagine Alex can fill in anything about it that I don't know for sure .

I've never heard of "stale" fuel making more power than fresh. I do know that the 'lights' are what have the most detonation resistance (octane), and everything I've read says to keep the fuel sealed until use. I store ALL my fuel in unvented jugs. I even drain the race fuel from the tank before leaving the track and keep it in sealed jugs between race dates.

I -would- be curious to learn more about this. Yes, larger molecules DO have a higher heat content (diesel has more heat than gasoline) but the detonation resistance and volatility (how easy it vaporizes) are a couple key things I'd be worried about. Remember, gas has to be vaporized to burn efficiently.

Neat topic...

------------------
Mike Burch
66 mustang real street
302 4-speed 289 heads
10.63 @ 129.3
http://www.geocities.com/carbedstangs/cmml_mburch.html
http://www.fortunecity.com/silverstone/healey/367

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Larry Jennings
Gearhead

Posts: 540
From: Redwood City, Ca. USA
Registered: Apr 2000

posted 01-29-2002 11:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Larry Jennings   Click Here to Email Larry Jennings     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I wasn't meaning to leave the fuel out 'til it stunk ! As is usually the case I don't understand everything I know about this. But as a side note I've never had a pinging problem with old smells like varnish gas, where I live you can buy an atom bomb easier than you can dispose of old gas so it's easier to run it out than drain it. I'm under the impression the cap gets left off for an hour or two depending on temperature to let out a big percentage of the light ends. I've been told (for what that's worth) that supercharged and nitrous car benifit most.

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