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Author Topic:   Engine rebuild tools
SteveLaRiviere
Administrator

Posts: 32067
From: Saco, Maine
Registered: May 99

posted 04-19-2002 12:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SteveLaRiviere   Click Here to Email SteveLaRiviere     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Someone asked me to make a list of special tools needed for a basic rebuild. I told them I'd post it here:

Off the top of my head, besides basic hand tools, you'll need:

*A quality engine stand. I highly recommend a 4 wheel stand. The three wheeled stands are just too tipsy. You could rebuild an engine without one, but why would you want to?

* Bag of trash bags, to cover the engine when you are not working on it. Don't pay big bucks for an 'engine rebuilding bag' Just buy a box of heavy duty trash bags and use a new one every time you work on it.

* Engine brush cleaning kit, to scrub every inch of the engine. Moroso sells a good kit. As you wash the engine, keep WD-40 or some other oil spray and keep all machined surfaces well oil. They will flash-rust {scale} in minutes if left bare. Paint cast areas as soon as possible, for the same reason.

* A 1/2" torque wrench. A beam type is probably your best buy, unless you can afford a GOOD click type, like a Snap-On. Craftsman click types are junk. I know, I have one. The gauge type torque wrench is the best, but they are big bucks.

* A harmonic balancer puller. Look for the type that comes with a balancer installing tool, as well.

* Piston ring installation tool. Not needed, but it prevents you from scarring the piston while installing the rings.

* Band type piston ring compressor. Sleeve types are good, but band types can be used for all diameters of pistons.

* Two 6 inch lengths of 5/16" or 3/8" rubber hose to slip over the rod bolts to prevent damage to the cylinder walls and rod journals during installation of the pistons. They make fancy sleeves, but good old rubber hose works better.

* Red and Green Plasti-gauge. Your machinist will be miking everything, but you should double check everything, just to be sure.

* Feeler gauges to check rod side clearances and ring gaps.

* Seal installation kit. Not essential, but very helpful.

*Valve spring compresser. Buy or rent a good quality one, as a cheapo unit can ruin parts in half a heartbeat.

*Dial indicators are a great tool to have for many reasons, but if all you want to do is locate TDC, you can make a tool with a 6" bar stock and a bolt. Drill the two ends to match opposing head bolt holes, and drill and tap a hole for the bolt in the center. Then to locate TDC, bring up the #1 piston until it contacts the bolt, mark the harmonic balancer, then turn the crank the other way until the piston contacts the bolt again. Mark the balancer again. TDC is exactly 1/2 between the two marks.

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'70 Mustang Mach 1 M code 351C 4V/FMX/3.25 open
'72 Mustang Sprint Coupe 351C 4V/FMX/4.30 Trac Lok
'94 F-150 XL 5.8L/E4OD/3.55 Limited Slip

MCA Member # 47773

My wife says I don't pay enough attention to her... or something like that...

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Larry Jennings
Gearhead

Posts: 540
From: Redwood City, Ca. USA
Registered: Apr 2000

posted 04-23-2002 12:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Larry Jennings   Click Here to Email Larry Jennings     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
You left off the machine that bores, hones, decks, line hones, cleans, paints and kisses you goodnight for only $100,000.00+ .

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SteveLaRiviere
Administrator

Posts: 32067
From: Saco, Maine
Registered: May 99

posted 04-23-2002 08:29 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SteveLaRiviere   Click Here to Email SteveLaRiviere     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That's optional.

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'70 Mustang Mach 1 M code 351C 4V/FMX/3.25 open
'72 Mustang Sprint Coupe 351C 4V/FMX/4.30 Trac Lok
'94 F-150 XL 5.8L/E4OD/3.55 Limited Slip

MCA Member # 47773

The secret of success is sincerity. Once you can fake that, you got it made.

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68F100
Gearhead

Posts: 1998
From: Fort Madison, Iowa USA - United We Stand
Registered: Oct 99

posted 06-26-2002 07:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 68F100   Click Here to Email 68F100     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm going to tear into an engine rebuild project soon(my first). I have a question about the engine stand. Autozone has one for $49.99 that has the four wheels like you suggested. It has a 750 lb rating. Is this a good enough stand for a smallblock? If not, where should I look for one? Not many places to choose from here in town.

Also, does anyone rent engine hoists(cherry picker)? I don't know anyone that has one and the $200+ to buy one could be better spent on goodies for the rebuild.

[This message has been edited by 68F100 (edited 06-26-2002).]

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68F100
Gearhead

Posts: 1998
From: Fort Madison, Iowa USA - United We Stand
Registered: Oct 99

posted 06-28-2002 01:44 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for 68F100   Click Here to Email 68F100     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just wanted to bring this back up before I go spend my money.

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SteveLaRiviere
Administrator

Posts: 32067
From: Saco, Maine
Registered: May 99

posted 06-28-2002 08:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SteveLaRiviere   Click Here to Email SteveLaRiviere     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yes, 750# is fine. It would be a little too small for big blocks, but it would be fine for a small block. 4 wheels are a must. I am currently borrowing Mike's 4 wheeled engine stand, and it is light years ahead of my junky 3 wheeler.

Most tool rental places rent engine cranes for about $20 a day.

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'70 Mustang Mach 1, '72 Mustang Sprint, '94 F-150
Pics

MCA Member # 47773

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MLariviere
Moderator

Posts: 3200
From: Biddeford,Me.USA
Registered: May 99

posted 06-28-2002 10:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for MLariviere   Click Here to Email MLariviere     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Another thing with pickers and stands. Don't go halves on it with anyone. We always seem to end up with the shorter stick,if you know what I mean.

Steve bought a hoist a few years back. It was $200, and well spent. It has already paid for itself.

Another great tool is a compressor. Hundreds of uses,from cleaning to painting to running tools. Money well spent,IMHO.

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68F100
Gearhead

Posts: 1998
From: Fort Madison, Iowa USA - United We Stand
Registered: Oct 99

posted 06-28-2002 11:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 68F100   Click Here to Email 68F100     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks for the tips. Autozone also had a pretty nice hoist for $200, but I just don't think I'll need it that much right now. Not enough to rob the rebuild fund anyway.

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DaveK
Gearhead

Posts: 236
From: Ashburn, VA
Registered: Dec 99

posted 03-04-2003 01:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for DaveK   Click Here to Email DaveK     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Any recommendations on where to get the tools listed? I don't have a clue where to get a piston ring installation tool.

Thanks.

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SteveLaRiviere
Administrator

Posts: 32067
From: Saco, Maine
Registered: May 99

posted 03-04-2003 02:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SteveLaRiviere   Click Here to Email SteveLaRiviere     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A good parts store will handle Lisle or KD Tools. They are reasonably priced and usually good quality.

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'70 Mustang Mach 1 - '72 Mustang Sprint - '94 F-150

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V8 Thumper
Gearhead

Posts: 3123
From: Orange, Ca. United States of America
Registered: Dec 2001

posted 03-10-2003 12:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for V8 Thumper   Click Here to Email V8 Thumper     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Although not absolutely necessary for your garden-variety stocker rebuild, a degree wheel is $30 well spent.

I like to mic everything, but good bore mics don't grow on trees
I'll second the dial indicator & magnetic base; check thrusts, TDC's, degree camshafts... worth its weight in gold

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1965 GT coupe, 333ci aluminum headed/solid cammed stroker, four speed, 3.70:1 9"

All Blue Oval, no blue bottle
http://mustangsandmore.50megs.com/V8Thumper.html

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V8 Thumper
Gearhead

Posts: 3123
From: Orange, Ca. United States of America
Registered: Dec 2001

posted 03-10-2003 12:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for V8 Thumper   Click Here to Email V8 Thumper     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The dial indicator also makes setting ring & pinion lash far more accurate than the marking compound or grease smear methods

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1965 GT coupe, 333ci aluminum headed/solid cammed stroker, four speed, 3.70:1 9"

All Blue Oval, no blue bottle
http://mustangsandmore.50megs.com/V8Thumper.html

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n2oMike
Gearhead

Posts: 1420
From: Spencer, WV
Registered: Jan 2001

posted 03-10-2003 10:13 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for n2oMike   Click Here to Email n2oMike     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by V8 Thumper:
The dial indicator also makes setting ring & pinion lash far more accurate than the marking compound or grease smear methods

You can't leave out the marking compound when setting up a rearend...

Both the pinion depth (adjusted by shims at the front of the case) and the position of the ring gear (adjusted by the threaded, round adjusters in the caps in an 8" or 9") have an effect on the 'pattern'.

You can adjust for the proper backlash with the side adjusters, but if the pinion depth isn't right, the pattern will be off and it will howl like a banshee in no time. (if not right away)

Even when setting the pinion depth with an indicator, the pattern still needs checked. There's a 'range' of acceptable measurements, and the correct pattern usually lies somewhere within those readings.

NEVER skip the pattern check on a rearend. There's a LOT more to it than getting the proper backlash. When in doubt, take it to someone who knows what they are doing, and insist on looking at the pattern before the unit gets installed.

Good Luck!

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Mike Burch
66 mustang real street
302 4-speed 289 heads
10.63 @ 129.3
http://www.geocities.com/carbedstangs/cmml_mburch.html
http://www.fortunecity.com/silverstone/healey/367
http://www.mustangworks.com/cgi-bin/moi-display.cgi?220

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